The Beatles’ ‘All You Need Is Love’: A Minute-by-Minute Breakdown

The Beatles - All You Need is Love

From RollingStone.com:

On June 1st, 1967, the Beatles released Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, boosting the sales of vintage military uniforms and further cementing their status as the biggest rock group in the world. Two weeks later, they started work on their next omnipresent musical event: participating in the Our World TV show on June 25th, employing Earth’s newly constructed satellite technology to deliver a live global broadcast from locales as far-flung as “Takamatsu and Tunis.”

The Beatles agreed to perform a new song as the representatives of the United Kingdom. “It was the first worldwide satellite broadcast ever,” Ringo Starr said years later. “It’s a standard thing that people do now, but then, when we did it, it was a first. That was exciting – we were doing a lot of firsts.”

Read more:

via The Beatles’ ‘All You Need Is Love’: A Minute-by-Minute Breakdown | Rolling Stone.

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A Revolution, With Guitars: How The Beatles Changed Everything

The Beatles With Ed Sullivan

This February 7 marks 50 years since The Beatles first came to America. A thousand tributes will tell you what happened. But how and why did it happen the way it did? What was America really like then, culturally and socially, that allowed the group to strike such a deep nerve? And what was it about The Beatles themselves—their backgrounds, their style, and of course their music—that made them so unlike anything Americans had seen before?

In his new e-book Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Beatles and America, Then and Now, Michael Tomasky explains the group’s impact in the context of the times in a richly detailed, often surprising, I-never-knew-that! account of why they became the phenomenon they did. Kurt Andersen says of Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: “This book was a revelation. No one has more lucidly and entertainingly distilled the whys and hows and look and feel of the moment the Sixties began.”

Continue reading Part One via A Revolution, With Guitars: How The Beatles Changed Everything – The Daily Beast.

Part Two – Before the Earthquake Hit: When The Beatles Landed in America

Part Three – ‘You’ve Got to Be Kidding’: Why Adults Dismissed The Beatles in 1964

Part Four – Was The Beatles’ Music Really That Unique? Yeah, It Totally Was

The Beatles Get Grammys Special on CBS

The Beatles with Ed Sullivan, 1964

CBS wants to hold a Beatles special.

The network will air a two-hour program about the Fab Four, “The Night That Changed America: A Grammy Salute to the Beatles,” that will feature contemporary artists performing Beatles tunes in addition to archival footage.

The special will air Feb. 9, the 50th anniversary of the band’s appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” for the network. Footage and other archival material from the night of the group’s “Sullivan” performance will be included, along with performers who’ll emphasize the importance of the group’s performance on the show.

Read more here:

The Beatles Get Grammys Special on CBS – Yahoo TV.

Paul McCartney on the Olympics opening ceremony

Paul McCartney at the 2012 Olympics

Paul McCartney, whose Twitter account rarely is from him personally, made an exception to the rule to comment on the Olympics opening ceremony he played on Friday night.

“Thanks for the great response guys! Tonight was terrific, great, really cool. It was a trip and very exciting. It was a great opening ceremony! Didn’t realize Her Majesty was such a good parachutist!”

(Read more and see the slideshow by clicking the link below)

via Paul McCartney on the Olympics opening ceremony: ‘terrific, great, really cool’ – National Beatles | Examiner.com.

Oldies Connection: Paul McCartney Cites Mark Wirtz’ “Teenage Opera” as Influence

A Teenage Opera - Mark Wirtz

No sooner does Oldies Connection post a blog about the new single by former EMI producer Mark Wirtz than Sir Paul McCartney cites the Wirtz classic “Teenage Opera” as a major influence on his songwriting!

(read more by clicking the link below)
Oldies Connection: Paul McCartney Cites Mark Wirtz’ “Teenage Opera” as Influence.